The Art of Foley – An Inside Look at Sound Effects in Film

T H E   A R T   O F   F O L E Y –
An Inside Look at Sound Effects in Film

Sound Effects are a driving force behind every film that can steer the audience’s emotions and expectations. An image of a door could be shown but the audience would know the emotional tone whether they heard the sounds of wine glasses clinking with plates and silverware milling about , or alternatively bone cracking and chainsaws revving. In one instance the audience is invited into a feast and the other they want to run in horror. The senses follow the sounds. Creating high quality sounds to use in one’s films is an undertaking and an art form in itself. In one instance there is a vast array of high quality sounds already available to you at AudioMicro.com, but sometimes you just want that personal touch and feel the drive to create your own sound effects. In this post we will be taking a look at what exactly goes into making a custom high quality sound effect and a brief history of how it all came to be.

Creating Sound Effects for Film

One of the great unsung heroes of any movie is easily the Foley Artist. These artists are the ones who create all the sound effects you hear throughout the film by using everyday objects in unexpected ways to generate unique sounds. Think banging a couple of coconut shells together to create the sound of a horse galloping like in Monty Python’s Holy Grail; that is a prime example of foley sound.

While on location of a film, modern day audio equipment is optimized for picking up the actors voice while cancelling out all the surrounding and background sounds that would breath life into the scene. This could be something subtle like the actor’s footsteps, opening a door, or even just scratching his own face, to the more in your face fighting scenes, scuffling, clashing swords, etc. It is these artists’ job to find out how to recreate any sound imaginable for any given scene and convince the audience it’s the real thing. Some examples of this would be something like stepping on VHS tape to create the sound of walking through autumn leaves. You can then pick up the same VHS tape and shake it to give the sense of bushes rustling in the wind. Another example would be stepping on a bag full of corn starch to create that sound of fresh snow crunching and compressing as its walked on. Even snapping or twisting a bunch of celery can sound like bones cracking or breaking. At the end of the day if the foley artist did his job right you will never know he did anything at all.

The Origin of Foley Sound Effects in Film

Before this method of foley sound became mainstream in film it was common practice for the time to have sound effects added into broadcasted radio plays to help paint a richer picture of what is happening for the audience. This is what helped pave the way for post sound effects to emerge into film.

The term Foley Artists comes from its creator, Jack Donovan Foley, who as a Universal employee developed the method of performing sound effects in sync with the film’s moving picture in post production back in the early mid 1900s. Jack and his team would have the movie projected in front of them and perform all the post sounds needed in one go and record it on one single track. Nowadays with the invention of computers and development of Non Linear Editing there are infinite amounts of tracks sounds can be recorded, retimed, and adjusted on that simply did not exist back then. At the time this method of creating post sound was called ‘Direct to Picture,’ and it wasn’t until years later that it became known as foley.

Modern Recording Practices of Foley Sound Effects

Today the common set up for post sound is 2 foley artists and 1 sound mixer on the mixing stage. The two artists will work in tandem to create the sound and will work from visual markers and cues projected on the film supplied by the mixer to help them match timing. However, these days it’s less critical if an artist misses the timing as this can be adjusted by the mixer, but making sure the feel of the sound matches perfectly is more of what’s necessary. These specialized mixing stages the foley artists work on will commonly have special sectioned floors with various textures and materials to step on to create various sounds. Along with having an ever expanding warehouse full of props and everyday items they have catalogued and can use at any given moment.

In the instance that you might need to add some foley sound to one of your own projects you can always go simple and experiment with a basic audio mic recording various sounds like footsteps, slamming doors, breaking celery and then test it out by cutting and remixing the sound back into your edit.

If you need something more robust and professional sounding, or you simply don’t quite know how to get that exact perfect sound effect you’re looking for – audiomicro.com has you covered! Just head to the website, select sound effects, and search for anything you need! There are literally 1000s of professional high quality sound effects to choose from that you can remix and cut back into your projects with confidence.

FCPX 10.1.2 New Features

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It’s been over three months since the last update to Final Cut Pro X, but now an update has finally appeared with added features to make the editing experience much smoother. With the 10.1.2 update, users now have greater control of media management, a new Pro Res codec, new effects/titles/transitions, and more. I’m going to highlight some of those new features and additions now.

Library Media Management

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Managing media in the library has enhanced, giving users more options for what goes in and what stays out. When you open FCPX 10.1.2, you now have the ability to look at the library properties through the inspector window. You can determine where media gets imported, where the cache files (render files, audio waveforms, and thumbnail images), and backups are stored. The old method required the user to find things from the Finder level. This is similar to how FCP legacy worked with scratch disk locations and other options when starting a project. The folks at Ripple Training provide a few training videos explaining the new media management the library offers below.

Import Enhancements

Users now have the ability to import media into the browser by dragging and dropping. If you are an editor who prefers organizing your clips from the Finder level, then you will enjoy this feature quite a bit.

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If you are using the Mavericks OSX, you can also create keyword collections based on Finder tags. If you select single or multiple files and tag them in the Finder, you have the option to create a keyword collection based on that tag.

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One addition added to the import window is the ability to sift through videos and photos using a drop down menu. Sometimes, you want to see all the media you recorded on a card, and sometimes you want to focus on either video or photo. This drop down addition makes the process easier.

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Apple Pro Res 4444 XQ

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Included in the update of FCPX is an Apple Pro App codecs update. This brings a new flavor of Pro Res known as Apple Pro Res 4444 XQ. This is the highest quality of the Pro Res codecs, and it has a very high data rate to preserve the detail in high-dynamic-range imagery generated by today’s highest-quality digital image sensors. This codec will probably work best with Arri Alexa and RED cameras that shoot 4K-6K clips. From what I’ve read, it has a data rate of about 500 Mbps, and supports embedded alpha channels as well. This new Pro Res codec will be used a lot for broadcast and cinema masters.

Audio Enhancements

Users of FCPX now have the ability to adjust audio volume of clips either relatively or absolutely. To do this, you can select your clips, go to the Modify>Adjust Volume option, and choose between Relative or Absolute.

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Improvements to Voice Tool have also been made. It includes a countdown feature which makes it easier to know when the audio will be at your playhead’s location. On top of that, you can place different takes of the voiceover in an audition clip to determine which has the best performance.

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Transitions, Titles, & Effects

One thing that went unnoticed (until it was brought up to the FCPX guru Alex Gollner) was the addition of new titles, transitions, and effects. FCPX 10.1.2 has added more items for users to integrate into their edits. You can see them all in this video Alex uploaded below.

Overall, I’m very happy with this new update and the progress Final Cut Pro X has made over the last three years. It wasn’t the most liked NLE at first, but little by little it has matured into an admirable piece of software that folks, like myself and others, can make money with. I look forward to what 10.1.3 brings us in the future.

Sound Effects

Spooky Sounds and Terrifying Tracks for Halloween

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There are lots of reasons why I love October. The air is getting cooler and the colors are changing. Football is in full swing and the World Series is within sight. I can finally start using Rocktober on my social media feeds. I never pass up a chance to get my German on at Oktoberfest while indulging in beer and brats. And, of course… pumpkin spiced EVERYTHING.

But the real reason to celebrate this time of year is the one night when you can dress up in not-safe-for-work attire and no one cares… Halloween! Before you hit up your costume parties as Bret Michaels or Bon Scott (Yep. I’ve done both. Bret Michaels was a bigger hit. Can you believe that?), you probably need to put the finishing touches on that creature feature and slasher flick you’ve been working on. Or maybe you want the perfect background royalty free music track to scare the kiddies as they venture on to your porch while trick-or-treating. Now is the time to take advantage of our top Halloween music and sound effects. We’ve already set aside our favorites here:

Hottest Halloween Music

Hottest Halloween Sound Effects

I love anything involving Zombies, so make sure to download the “Single Zombie Snarl” sound effect. It would go perfect with “Movie Homicide” and would even make George Romero proud.

And what’s scarier than a creepy little kid in a horror flick? That’s right. Nothing. “House of Marionettes” seems sweet and innocent, but there’s definitely something sinister going on. It makes me shudder just thinking about it. Juxtapose that with “BANSHEE, SCREAM” and you’ve got yourself a heart stopper.

We all know that picking the right song or sound effect can make or break a project. The right file could be the difference between making the next “Exorcist II: The Heretic” and “The Exorcist.” Keep the evil spirits at bay and choose wisely… you might just be able to sleep at night.

Creating a Bin Structure Inside Your NLE

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One of the things I pride myself on having when I edit a project is a proper bin structure. When you are tasked with having a project that contains over 100 clips of footage, titles and miscellaneous assets such as photos, logos, motion graphics and more, your project browser can get very messy very quickly. Below is an example of a typical bin structure I utilize on projects. I add or delete bins based on my needs so this can change at a moment’s notice. I’m going to breakdown the significance of each bin and some of their sub bins so that you get an idea on how to structure your bin organization.

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Audio

In this bin it’s obvious what’s placed here. I have sub bins for royalty free music tracks and sound effects. If I need an additional sub bin for something like voiceovers, I would create another bin and title that VO. If I want to get even more picky and specific, I would create sub bins for audio formats such as .mp3, .wav or .aiff. I would create sub bins within the music sub bin and sound effects sub bin for each of those formats. The benefit of doing that is to know what format I’m dealing instead of grouping everything into one bin and being none the wiser.

Images

In this bin is where I place client images, artwork, logos and more. In this particular example, I have sub bins for many of the popular image formats such as jpeg, png, tiff, psd. With images, it’s really easy for it to become messy and confusing if you just import all your images into one bin labeled images. This sub bin structure is meant to help sort and differentiate between what I have to work with. In most situations, I may not need all these sub bins but I keep them in case I’m given more client images down the line.

Mograph

This bin is meant to hold any motion graphics elements I plan to use or any exports that were created in After Effects. I may have custom motion graphics I created and plan to use and the last thing I want is it scattered all over the place. AE renders is a base folder I would use when starting a project. I could add sub bins within that labeled client custom mograph or segments to reflect graphics exported from After Effects that need specific bins. The other sub bin you see has the name of some popular royalty free graphics developers I use on regular basis. This sub bin has a tendency to grow or shrink depending on the need of the project. For most cases, I usually have at least 3-5 sub bins in this section just in case.

Footage

By far the most important bin to have in any structure. This is where my footage will go but I usually have several sub bins with the Master Clips bin. I like to label my footage bin from what card and shooter/camera they came from so I can reference them in case anything goes offline. There are obviously different ways to go about this but essentially all footage will go here. If I plan on using sub clips in the edit, I would create a folder for that and place them there. I tend to rarely use sub clips in most edits I do because I have a different method of sorting my footage.

Sequences

It is in this bin where I’m extra picky and cautiously organized. I keep versions of my main sequences as the project progresses usually appending them with something like this: Project Name_Main_01. With the underscores, I am able to go back to the first cut of my main sequence in case I need to start over or pick an arrangement that worked previously.

The selects reel bin is meant to have sequences of my footage grouped by the following criteria: b-roll and sound bites. What I do is go through my master clips and drop them in the appropriate titled sequence. For example, if I come across footage that has interviews or dialogue relevant to my edit, I would drop them in my sound bites sequence. That way I no longer need to use my project panel to search for specific clips. I can go through my selects sequences for either interviews or b-roll and grab what I need. I found this method very efficient and it also allows me to move faster.

Conclusion

This bin structure is a useful base for which I organize most of my projects. With it, I can add or delete bins if needed and keep everything as organized as possible. It’s good to have an evolving bin structure as one structure may not always be sufficient and you need to examine how to make it better for any specific project. Overall, utilize a bin structure to maintain your sanity and have peace of mind when you are editing. I’m the NLE Ninja with AudioMicro asking you to stay creative.

Royalty Free Music

The Best YouTube Export Settings in Adobe Premiere

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YouTube…it’s the most popular video destination in the world, the second most popular search engine (behind Google), and the third most popular website (behind Google and Facebook). Love it or hate it, YouTube has quickly become the go to place to consume video content. This means that if your videos/films aren’t on YouTube yet then chances are you’re not reaching the audience that you could. Unless your projects are for large scaled distribution on TV or in theaters, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t have your videos on a YouTube channel.

But before you decide uploading that massive wedding video that was meant to be played back on DVD, you should really reconsider how it will play out on the web, where streaming speed is king. Keep in mind that the wrong codec, or too large of a file size can greatly hinder your video’s stream-ability on YouTube and other video sharing sites. Not to mention that certain codecs just don’t play nicely with video streaming. In this post, I’ll cover each step to exporting an HD video in 1080p to YouTube in detail below. Keep in mind that this guide is a general guide and may or may not need to be altered depending on your pre-production settings and other various variables. However, these settings should work in virtually any production environment whether the footage was shot on iPhone, DSLR, XD-CAM, or any other format.

Step 1 – Export Media

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First, we’re going to need to call up the export media dialog box in order to get started.  Simply go to File > Export > Media or you can hit Command/CNTRL + M to bring up the dialog box so we can export our project.

Step 2 – Export Settings and Sequence

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This is the first portion of the dialog box that you will encounter and it is perhaps the most important. Here you will find a summary of your output settings and your source settings. You’re going to want to pay attention to this and make sure they match the same settings for both output and source. Your source settings are what you selected when you first started editing the sequence(s) and usually match the camera settings that you shot on. Another important note is that if you shot in 720p, do not try to force the output to 1080p (1920×1080) because it will just distort the video further if a user selects “1080p” on YouTube’s playback quality. Additionally if you want to play it safe, check the “Match Sequence Settings” check box to make everything work together. The last important area to look at is the “Format” drop down box , right now it’s set to H.264 which is essential.

Step 3 – Codec/Format Selection

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As mentioned in the previous step, you’re going to want to use H.264 codec for streaming video. This is the defacto standard for most video today, and for DSLR shooters is the native codec that clips are shot in. YouTube and other video sharing sites specify H.264 to be the best option for web video.

We won’t go into the explanation of what codecs are or what each one does, as an entire book could be written on that but just keep in mind your various options in this dialog list. If your format/codec wasn’t preset to H.264, simply select it from the drop down list and you’ll be set.

Step 4 – Frame Rate, Standards, & More

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This step is almost self-explanatory. Make sure to set your TV standard to NTSC if you’re in North America, and PAL if anywhere else. Your frame width and height should be 1920x1080p if you’re planning to show your video at full 1080p quality.  The pixel aspect ratio should be set to 16:9 to show a nice full widescreen and don’t even think about touching the iMax setting for 2:21:1 , YouTube just doesn’t support that…yet.

Step 5 – Bitrate encoding. Very important!

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This step has to be the MOST important step of them all. This step could make or break your video quality and its ability to even be uploaded. The general rule here is to keep your bitrate maximum target at less than 18 Mbps, that way you don’t end up with a massive file size that will hinder your video’s potential ability to even be uploaded depending on your account limitations. Keeping your target and maximum under 20 usually will give you a very high quality output and will look great streaming on YouTube. All of my YouTube videos are set usually around 13 – 15 for the maximum bitrate and look good even when blown up to a 55″ LED Samsung TV. Now if you were trying to export this for a DVD or Blue Ray you would obviously have a larger bitrate, but for the purpose of Youtube lets keep it small.

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Keeping the bitrate around 13 keeps my nice 5 minute video at around 416MB which is a good size and will upload fairly quickly to YouTube.  Ideally your files are 500MG (0.5GB or less) unless you have a really fast upload pipe.

Step 6 – Audio Settings

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The audio settings are usually pretty simple to deal with. By default for the H.264 codec they will be locked in at AAC, which is the perfect companion for streaming web video. Make sure your output channel is set to stereo, and your audio quality set to high for optimal audio. The most important feature here though, is the bitrate (Kbps).

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Here, I have my bitrate set to 192 which is pretty high quality for audio but it isn’t the best. Keep in mind typical mp3 quality is 128 kbps and usually anyone can that tell it’s a junky mp3.  Most of the low quality stuff was rendered at 128 which to most people won’t sound good, especially on the YouTube where the audio is further compressed. You’ll want to go with 192 kbps or higher. 320 kbps is the standard for “CD Quality” and will make your total output file size a few megabytes larger but it won’t do any real damage to the file size. Consider how important the audio is in your video and select the appropriate bitrate.

Lastly, don’t forget to hit the “export” button to start rendering your video file and you’re all set.

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Hopefully that tutorial was helpful to you. Happy YouTubing everyone and good luck!  If you have questions, please leave them for me in the comments section below.

‘Tis the Season for Certified Holiday Hotness

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With the Holidays just around the corner, ’tis definitely the time to introduce you to some holiday hotness from some of AudioMicro’s top contributors. We have everything from classic arrangements of your favorite holiday tunes to fresh, contemporary renditions as well (and a few sound effects to round out the selection).

Our music and sound review team has worked hard to put together the following fantastic collection of royalty free Christmas music and sound effects for your holiday videos.

FreddieHangoler is one of our favorite artists. He most often composes gorgeous and emotive orchestral pieces suitable for epic film trailers. Here is his take on “We Wish You a Merry Christmas”:
                  

EasyAccessMusic is a long standing AudioMicro contributor. His productions are versatile and always top quality. “Holiday Bells” has an uplifting, happy feel perfect for your Holiday productions:

Cinematone produces top notch orchestra music. Here is their take on “We Wish You a Merry Christmas”:

What would a Holiday playlist be without “Jingle Bells”? Not much of one I suppose. AMAH delivers with this fun, jazzy version driven by a great stand up bass line:

You can see the Elves bustling about making last minute gifts in Santa’s workshop in this fun, children’s focused track “Christmas Eve” by Fortefill:

Dreaming of a White Christmas? This elegantly composed version of “Let it Snow” by PPaul3 is the perfect tune for you:
                  

If you’re looking for something a little more contemporary, with a little urban appeal then WeAreAA‘s hip hop take on “Deck the Halls” is perfect:

That does it for music tracks. Let’s move on to some appropriate sound effects for your holiday videos and multimedia. For starters, you gotta have sleigh bells! Wills.theatresound provides:

Here is a nice group vocal shouting “Merry Christmas” by Blastwavefx:

And here are a few takes from Santa himself by Csproductions:

And lastly, Soundjay provides us with some very well sampled footsteps in snow:
                  

That does it for this year’s Holiday Hotness. Of course, we have thousands of other royalty free music tracks and sound effects geared towards the holidays, so if you didn’t hear what you’re looking for, be sure to drop us a line and our support team will be glad to assist.

Have a great Holiday season and upcoming New Year. Cheers!

 

Welcome to the New AudioMicro!

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Today, we are pleased to officially announce a completely redesigned and all new AudioMicro.com.  It’s the culmination of many months of hard work by our team.

We’ve been listening to your feedback and the latest version of AudioMicro incorporates your suggestions.  Highlights include:

  • an awesome new HTML5 audio player that allows you to quickly listen to your search and browse results, easily add them to your favorites, and your shopping cart
  • cleaner, slicker interface and user experience
  • improved, more accurate search and advanced search features
  • elimination of non-selling, low rated music tracks so that you’ll only hear the highest quality tunes
  • addition of over 100,000 new sound effects from the world renown Sound Ideas library.
  • more affordable sound effects pricing
  • watermarked, downloadable preview files (coming soon)
  • a highly simplified license agreement (no more platinum collection)
  • elimination of subscription plans for future purchases
  • MOST IMPORTANT – we’ve eliminated the credit system in favor of a more simple, dollar based pay as you go shopping experience (like Amazon.com)

Full details are in the press release below.   We hope 2012 is your best year ever.

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HEADLINE

AudioMicro Adds 100,000 New Sound Effects from Sound Ideas; Unveils Redesigned Website, Pricing, and License Agreement

SUMMARY

AudioMicro.com to represent over 100,000 sound effects from the Sound Ideas library.  New website offers simplified end user license agreement and pricing schema.

BODY

LOS ANGELES, April 27, 2012 – AudioMicro.com announces the addition of the Sound Idea sound effects library, adding over 100,000 professional royalty free sound effects to its online archive.  Headed by Brian Nimens, an audio veteran with more than 35 years experience, Sound Ideas offers an immense variety of contemporary and vintage sound FX keeping its ears tuned to the current and future needs of sound designers and producers.

“We are pleased to make our sounds available through AudioMicro, a real innovator in the marketplace,” said Nimens.

Categories within the Sound Ideas collection include ambience, animals, impacts, guns, production elements, science fiction, whooshes, and everything in between.  The addition of Sound Ideas brings AudioMicro’s total file count to over 300,000 stock music and sound effects tracks, all pre-cleared for use in creative audio-visual productions.

In addition to the 100,000 new sound effects from the Sound Ideas library, AudioMicro has launched a new version of its website, targeted at purchasers of royalty free music and sound effects, including YouTube users, iPhone/iPad app developers, and film/TV producers.  New visitors to AudioMicro.com will find a completely revamped user interface and design, making it a rich and simple destination for discovering and licensing stock audio.

Visitors to the new AudioMicro experience improved utility and design, including:

  • A slick HTML5 audio player which allows users to more easily browse the archive and locate the perfect cue or effect for their projects
  • Pay as you go, dollar based pricing – the credit based purchasing system has been retired
  • A simplified end user license agreement that allows tracks to be purchased once and used over and over again in multiple projects by the same buyer
  • Embeddable Tracks – embed your favorite tracks on websites, blogs, Facebook, etc.
  • Customizable Favorites Lists – create multiple favorites collections to preview your favorite tracks on the fly, before you buy
  • API Integration – the AudioMicro API allows approved partner platforms and resellers to create highly customizable applications utilizing the AudioMicro library.  Early API partners include SlideRocket, Hark, and Amana Images (Japan)
  • Brand new content and features to be announced over the coming months

About AudioMicro

AudioMicro is the largest micro stock music and sound effects collection. With over 300,000 royalty free music tracks and sound effects ready to be downloaded on demand, if it’s audio that you need, we’ve got you covered. We license music and sound effects to media producers of all shapes and sizes. Our music ends up in a wide variety of productions from independent regional advertisements to full scale national campaigns. Our sound effects can be heard in everything from Kill Bill Volumes 1 and 2 to your friends’ recent YouTube video.

About Sound Ideas

Founded in 1978, Toronto-based Sound Ideas was the first company to release sound effects libraries on compact disc, and the first to release the sound effects library of a major motion picture studio. The company publishes more than 1,000 CDs and more than 150,000 sound effects.  It continues to adapt new technology in order to offer quality audio to professional sound designers and producers in the broadcast, post-production and multimedia industries.

October Update- Hot New Royalty Free Music Tracks

Hi there music lovers, media producers, youtubers and the like. We hope you had a great summer and are looking forward to another exciting fall season of production. We’re sure you’re beyond busy again with TV and Webisodes, commercials and all that good stuff…and so wanted to share some awesome sonic goodies to help you along.

DaveLayne (music)

Dave joined us only a couple months ago and has already amassed over 90 fantastically high quality tracks. Dave is a great guitarist, and it shows in his diverse collection of tunes ranging from Surf rock to Big beat. Take a few minutes to check out his diverse selection of tracks here.

Wills.TheatreSound (sfx)

Will has been with us for some time and has some very specialized ambiences and shorter sounds as well. He really provides a lot of the in between material that is difficult to find but oh so important for a great sound and foley mix. Check out his collection here.

MartynHarvey (music)

Martyn has been with us since the early days and has a broad range of tracks. He has a definitive fun vibe to his music but also is not shy to go into more emotive realms as well. Everything he produces is pristine, quality sonics with top-notch composition. Check out his portfolio here.

We hope you find the above portfolios beneficial for your upcoming projects. Please note we’re gearing up for a super holiday season here so if you are looking for anything in particular, drop us a line and let us know and we’ll be sure to include it in our next update.

iPhone Obsessions: iDrum

Image courtesy of Ministry of Sound

The iPhone app store has single-handedly become a choice distraction for those looking to max out their mobile potential on the go or at home. Any audiophile can tell you that the store is chock full of music software to satisfy all musical palettes, ranging from casual games to truncated production applications.

iDrum happens to be one such application, offering users the chance to visually produce originally manufactured beats as well as augment previously existing ones. Presented by legendary DJ label Ministry of Sound, iDrum features over 300 original samples for users to toy with, as well as 20 kits featuring different instruments to weave into various beats. With a completely unique interface resembling that of a sampler, iDrum allows users to zoom in to specific squares (that represent different instruments and effects), altering and editing to any style or taste.

While the app may seem a bit daunting at first, there is certainly a learning curve involved in creating music with such a tiny device. It may be instinctual to haphazardly tap the interface upon first glance, which will inevitably produce distorted and displeasing music. However, with a $5.99 price tag, iDrum is simply one of those applications that, no matter how quickly you learn, maintains its longevity and entertainment value long after it’s purchased.

What have you got to lose?

With micro payment, artists may think they are underselling themselves; however, the reality is that with micro payment, you are actually opening up your library to an entirely new group of content purchaser that never before would ever think about paying for a sync license – the YouTube crowd. As video continues to proliferate the internet, as internet video quality continues to improve (we can now watch HD videos and audio on free sites like Pluggedin) and video proliferates every website and blog, it’s obvious that audio becomes increasingly important in the equation. The importance of Audio is easy to overlook, but just try watching a movie without any sound, or try watching a video with only dialogue and no background music, sound effects, or other audio-visual goodness. It’s much less stimulating, if not totally unbearable. Without Audio, Video would be a dull boring and arguably meaningless mess. Licensing your content on AudioMicro opens up your portfolio to an entirely new audience, and and entirely new customer base. The market for online audio is going to continue to grow well into the foreseable future. Even bloggin softwares, including WordPress are incorporating one click audio (and video) insert options into all blog posts. Will bloggers be stealing (pirating) content or legally licensing in through a micro payment desination like AudioMicro. We believe that 90% of folks will “play by the rules” and do the right thing and purchase an AudioMicro subscription or credit package in order to properly secure the sync license required to add the meaningful, important, crucial audio content to their editorial and commercial projects, both online and offline.