Finders, Keepers: How to get your production music into the right hands via music libraries?

Tips for music producers

Production music libraries have become the
go-to music tool for many producers and music teams looking for the right music
to match their picture. A great deal of production music work used to be custom
work for hire, but that’s changing as projects face ever tighter timelines and
budgets–and as more and more people and organizations are creating video and
seeking out licensed music for it.

I’ve been working as a composer for much
longer, but ten years ago, I started uploading cues to libraries like Audiomicro,
which has become one of my favorites. It started out as a way to fill my time,
to keep writing for fun between scoring gigs. Revenue from libraries now makes
up 60% of my yearly revenue. I keep writing and it keep growing and to keep
building my rep. Like many dedicated production composers, I write all the
time, as much as I can.

Search is key to making the most of these
platforms, and that means you need to understand how to communicate what your
cue’s all about in a few short words, tags, and other features. A little
thought and common sense can go a long way to getting your cues found and kept
by producers.

Discovery
is a numbers game

Production music is a numbers game. Full stop.
You have to produce a lot of music. It is a biz for people who write well and
efficiently without a lot of torment. You can’t spend three days on two minutes
of music. Do that for your own compositions, but not for production library
use. These catalogs are growing every day. You can’t write 20 pieces of music,
submit it to Audiomicro, and then complain about your lack of revenue. You need
to produce.

Figure
out what it really sounds like

I think my experience in working with real
producers and doing custom music has permeated my sense of how to describe
things. If I’m writing a few sentences, I try to think about what my friends in
video or film might be looking for. How can I give them a sense of what this
is? No need for long description, no need to implant metadata. I want my reader
to understand what to expect. Match the mood of the music.

Is it moderately paced or driving? Is it
quirky or contemplative? Take up the space with the word. That list will be the
descriptors that make someone go, “Yep, that’s what it is, thank you!” Then if
you’re allowed, use reasonable synonyms to improve your chances of discovery.
For example, optimistic and positive mean the same thing in tags. Don’t know
exactly what people are looking for.

Give it
a title

Titles are metadata, hints to what the piece
is about. It needs to really sound like that title. It’s a mistake to give
something an abstract or very specific or personal title. It may be important
to you, but it won’t mean much to a producer.

When I start writing, I start with the title.
If someone is browsing via genre, like say, folk or pop, my titles need to
convey something. If they see “Warm Spring Morning,” and it sounds like a cold
autumn night, they won’t listen to anything else you’ve put out there. But if
it sounds like its title, you develop trust.

Often, I’ll come up with 10-15 titles before I
write a note. I want to come up with the pictures and images, words the evoke a
feeling or sound to me. I jot them down. I can write to that title. The music
and title need to have a real connection.

Step
away from the computer

Hear me out. It’s easy to get caught up in
data and dropdowns, but sometimes you need to take a few moments away from the
screen to sit and listen. Jot down a few adjectives or genres or other words
that come to mind as you do. You’ll have a clearer, more honest reaction to
your work, and you’ll save yourself the trouble when you need to add tags to
your cues when you upload them to a library.

Resist
the temptation to overtag

A cue with a ton of tags looks suspect. If you
have dozens of different mood tags, you’re likely seeing diminishing returns.
You’re likely stretching. You may win a battle by getting in search results,
but you’ll lose the war.

Producers with limited time want tags to let them zero in on their options as quickly as possible. When they see the word “pretty” and the cue is not really “pretty”, they are going to get frustrated. If you’re overloading pieces with every possible tag, you’re out of bounds. That will make producers not want to go back.

Length
matters

One client I worked for always wanted three
versions of cues: 60 seconds, 30 seconds, and “a thing.” (Don’t ask.) I’ve kept
to that approach, as it helps with the numbers game. You’re submitting three pieces
instead of one. You can legitimately fill up more data space and get bigger
hits.

It also helps clients who have a wide range of
needs. Lots of clients don’t want to do a lot of editing so 60- and 30-second
cues are helpful.

That said, don’t take shortcuts. You have to
do a good edit. Don’t fade out, anyone can do that. When you’re writing and
you’re in your DAW, if you have a sequencer say, when you finish the full
piece, make nice smaller pieces. Cut and paste and snip. Then add the final
ending you imagine for the piece. Producers don’t want to hear a chop; they
want to hear the last four seconds that would be the same as the end of the
full track.

There is no perfect or right way to make music, of course, and there’s no single answer to how to get that music to come up in an interested producer’s search. However, if you take a few extra moments to think through your tags, titles, and cue lengths, you’ll expand your repertoire and make its essence instantly recognizable, building trust and radically improving your chances at a placement.

Bruce Zimmerman

Bruce
Zimmerman is the composer
and owner of Sound Productions, a film scoring project studio located in
Windsor, Connecticut. Zimmerman began his career over 20 years ago, after
attaining a Doctorate of Music from the Hartt School of Music in West Hartford,
Connecticut.

Zimmerman has scored over 500
programs for clients such as AT&T, IBM, PBS, History Channel, Connecticut
Public Television, FOX Network, The Learning Channel, MasterCard, Pratt and
Whitney, Random House, Sony Kids Music, Simon & Schuster, McGraw Hill and
Warner Brothers. Zimmerman has won three Emmy Awards for Outstanding Individual
Achievement in Original Music Composition for his work in Public Television. He
is a member of ASCAP and the International Documentary Association (IDA).

The Top 3 Greatest Sound Brands on YouTube

Y O U T U B E   S O U N D   B R A N D S –  A N D   W H Y   Y O U   N E E D   O N E !

The Top 3 Greatest Sound Brands on YouTube

And Tips to Create Your Own Notable YouTube Video Style

There is one thing that all famous YouTubers have in common whether it be vlogging, tech reviewing, sketch comedy, cooking or just about any other genre or sub genre on YouTube that has found mass audience appeal –  a sound brand. In this entry, let’s take a closer look at the Top 3 YouTubers whose sound branding absolutely is on point.

But first, what is a sound brand? Well take a moment and think of your all time favorite YouTuber and ask yourself “Do they have an intro and outro with a notable music loops or sound effects?” “Do they have background music or regular sound effects that you have come to recognize to be synonymous with the show?” Those are all prime examples of a sound brand. Sounds, effects, and music loops all easily obtained from websites such as AudioMicro.com but utilized and regularly fed back to the audience in a way that the sound or loop itself becomes iconically entwined with the show. The overall ability that even if you just heard the music and sounds commonly used in your favorite YouTube series without seeing any visuals that you would immediately be able to identify the show is evidence of successful sound branding and what helps make the biggest youtube channels.

#3 Casey Neistat – 10 million subscribers

The man who invented the vlog – Casey Neistat. Easily one of the most popular youtubers on the platform these days. He understood early on the importance of creating a prominent sound brand within his vlogs and he quickly incorporated his skateboard grunge esthetic into everything he possibly could; especially so in regards to sound. Each vlog will kick off with his intro and original track followed by a series of background grunge loops and tracks he’s curated and compiled over the years and will use when he needs to subtley convey different emotions he is trying to evoke in sections of his vlog. The background music content he uses has become so popular as his sound brand that you can even search on YouTube playlist mixes of Casey’s Neistat that they too has millions of listens. Without his sound branding Casey Neistat’s vlogs would lack the emotional punch and drive they so inherently carry. Check out some of his vlogs and see how skillfully sound branding can enhance your project.

#2 Game Theory – 11 million subscribers

Video games are always – ALWAYS – all the rage, and YouTube is no exception. Close on the heels of live Twitch streams comes a dedicated bunch of gamers on the YouTube platform with incredibly sizable fan bases. One particular YouTube gamer, Mat Pat at Game Theory, has found a niche of researching a games lore and developing new and sometimes unexpected theories about the games we all hold near and dear. From his branded musical intro followed by him toting off his notable slogan “Hey Guys! Welcome to Game Theory” altogether creates an incredibly recognizable and powerful sound brand. It’s this one-two punch of branding that I find so effective that I’ve even caught myself humming along to the intro and matching Mat’s slogan as a new episode comes on.

#1 Good Mythical Morning – 14 million subscribers

The singing and variety series comedic duo, Rhett and Link, who host Good Mythical Morning have been mainstream YouTubers since the very beginning of the platform. Early on in their career they realized the importance of creating a premium sound brand. Nowadays their primary show is a daily variety comedy series called Good Mythical Morning. Each episode may cover a new subject and content but in each episode their is a clear and recognizable opening and closing bumper along with notable transition sounds and background music. They recently just started their 15th season (Wow!) and following their trend the only thing that changes between seasons is their intro and outro sound branding which I find to be a refreshing way to audibly cue the listeners into feeling the show has a new layer of renewed energy even after so many seasons.

There you have it! You know realize the best YouTubers are in part the ones who know how to create a memorable and lasting sound brands for their fan base. Now you know it’s not just what you show the audience, but it’s also how you sound to the audience that can a leave a lasting impression that goes far beyond after the video is over. If you’re in the market to develop your very own sound brand and don’t quite know where to start may I humbly suggest checking out AudioMicro.com for all your sounds, effects, and music loops needs to get up and running quickly and sounding amazing!

What do you think? Are these the freshest sound brands on Youtube at the moment? Do you know someone with a better sound brand or think we missed one? We’re always down to check out new and amazing talent on YouTube. Let us know in the comments below!

The Art of Foley – An Inside Look at Sound Effects in Film

T H E   A R T   O F   F O L E Y –
An Inside Look at Sound Effects in Film

Sound Effects are a driving force behind every film that can steer the audience’s emotions and expectations. An image of a door could be shown but the audience would know the emotional tone whether they heard the sounds of wine glasses clinking with plates and silverware milling about , or alternatively bone cracking and chainsaws revving. In one instance the audience is invited into a feast and the other they want to run in horror. The senses follow the sounds. Creating high quality sounds to use in one’s films is an undertaking and an art form in itself. In one instance there is a vast array of high quality sounds already available to you at AudioMicro.com, but sometimes you just want that personal touch and feel the drive to create your own sound effects. In this post we will be taking a look at what exactly goes into making a custom high quality sound effect and a brief history of how it all came to be.

Creating Sound Effects for Film

One of the great unsung heroes of any movie is easily the Foley Artist. These artists are the ones who create all the sound effects you hear throughout the film by using everyday objects in unexpected ways to generate unique sounds. Think banging a couple of coconut shells together to create the sound of a horse galloping like in Monty Python’s Holy Grail; that is a prime example of foley sound.

While on location of a film, modern day audio equipment is optimized for picking up the actors voice while cancelling out all the surrounding and background sounds that would breath life into the scene. This could be something subtle like the actor’s footsteps, opening a door, or even just scratching his own face, to the more in your face fighting scenes, scuffling, clashing swords, etc. It is these artists’ job to find out how to recreate any sound imaginable for any given scene and convince the audience it’s the real thing. Some examples of this would be something like stepping on VHS tape to create the sound of walking through autumn leaves. You can then pick up the same VHS tape and shake it to give the sense of bushes rustling in the wind. Another example would be stepping on a bag full of corn starch to create that sound of fresh snow crunching and compressing as its walked on. Even snapping or twisting a bunch of celery can sound like bones cracking or breaking. At the end of the day if the foley artist did his job right you will never know he did anything at all.

The Origin of Foley Sound Effects in Film

Before this method of foley sound became mainstream in film it was common practice for the time to have sound effects added into broadcasted radio plays to help paint a richer picture of what is happening for the audience. This is what helped pave the way for post sound effects to emerge into film.

The term Foley Artists comes from its creator, Jack Donovan Foley, who as a Universal employee developed the method of performing sound effects in sync with the film’s moving picture in post production back in the early mid 1900s. Jack and his team would have the movie projected in front of them and perform all the post sounds needed in one go and record it on one single track. Nowadays with the invention of computers and development of Non Linear Editing there are infinite amounts of tracks sounds can be recorded, retimed, and adjusted on that simply did not exist back then. At the time this method of creating post sound was called ‘Direct to Picture,’ and it wasn’t until years later that it became known as foley.

Modern Recording Practices of Foley Sound Effects

Today the common set up for post sound is 2 foley artists and 1 sound mixer on the mixing stage. The two artists will work in tandem to create the sound and will work from visual markers and cues projected on the film supplied by the mixer to help them match timing. However, these days it’s less critical if an artist misses the timing as this can be adjusted by the mixer, but making sure the feel of the sound matches perfectly is more of what’s necessary. These specialized mixing stages the foley artists work on will commonly have special sectioned floors with various textures and materials to step on to create various sounds. Along with having an ever expanding warehouse full of props and everyday items they have catalogued and can use at any given moment.

In the instance that you might need to add some foley sound to one of your own projects you can always go simple and experiment with a basic audio mic recording various sounds like footsteps, slamming doors, breaking celery and then test it out by cutting and remixing the sound back into your edit.

If you need something more robust and professional sounding, or you simply don’t quite know how to get that exact perfect sound effect you’re looking for – audiomicro.com has you covered! Just head to the website, select sound effects, and search for anything you need! There are literally 1000s of professional high quality sound effects to choose from that you can remix and cut back into your projects with confidence.

Meet A&R Manager – Joshua Priest

T E A M   M E M B E R   P R O F I L E :
AN INTERVIEW WITH AUDIOMICRO’S A&R MANAGER:

At AudioMicro, we’ve got a commitment to the high quality of music we provide, and our A&R Manager is at the heart of this mission.  Meet the man, behind the man, behind the man, Joshua Priest.

– Thanks, Josh, for interviewing with me today.  So you are the resident music expert and A&R manager for AudioMicro!  How long have you been working with the company?

Answer: I’ve been with the company for four years, and I’ve been managing A&R and the ingest contracts for artists for the past two years.

– Very nice. What’s your background with music?

Answer: Well, I’ve been playing guitar for 14 years. And I’ve always been into music ever since I was a kid.  I mean, basically, music has just been a big part of the journey in my life. Because, you know, when you play an instrument, you’re forever learning and struggling with things that you don’t know. Your music within itself is a language, so you’re always kind of learning, every single day. And it’s great. I deal with other people’s music every day as well.  I get to kind of get a snapshot of their musical journey as well.

– So it’s almost like music is a teacher in a way.  And what’s your background before working in the music industry for AudioMicro?

Answer:  I used to work in TV, for  G4 TV, which is now defunct, unfortunately, and I also worked for a year with NBC. I started off as a production assistant for about a year and half, then became a producer myself.

– Ok, so you have a background in music and in producing. With that experience under your belt, what are some top things that you’re looking for as far as the quality of the tracks that you’re ingesting for AudioMicro’s library?

Answer: Well I definitely want to listen to how things are mixed.  We want to provide top-quality music so mixing is very important.I also want to listen to how the melodies fit into the genre that they’re trying to achieve.

Then I also like to listen to the quality of their plugins. Say with a song that has flute, you can basically tell when they have a really good plugin because you can’t tell the difference between a real flute and a really good plugin of the flute.

Sometimes I hear a film score, and I can’t tell if the artist recorded an orchestra or just on his computer doing this?  Either way, it doesn’t matter because it sounds amazing.

I can hear their level of professionalism and effort within the first 30 seconds.

And then there’s timing.  Sometimes people will upload tracks, and you can just hear that the drums are off, or the rhythm guitar is going at a certain beat per minute. But then, the lead guitar is playing way too quick, or way too slow compared to it. And you can tell that it’s not something that they’re actually trying to achieve.

And, one more thing I’d like to add. When you listen to someone’s music, if you can close your eyes, and you can see the song that they’re making being used in some sort of production, like I can see this being in a movie, or I can see this being the background of a blog on YouTube or something like that, then you know that you’ve got something good.

– So the way that it’s mixed, the melody fitting the genre, the quality of the sounds and plugins, and the timing, those are some of the things that you look for when you’re rating.  And, because of your background and TV and music, you need to imagine where it could be used, and it may need to evoke some emotion in you?

Answer: Yeah. Actually, I won’t lie. There’ve been a few times I’ve uploaded contracts to AudioMicro and I was going through a new artist’s music that were just very sad songs. And I felt a very strong reaction, my heartstrings were getting pulled, and I was like, “Oh, I better stop listening to this. I don’t want to start crying at my desk!”

Some of these artists they are really good at what they do. And if I can listen to music and feel emotional, that’s a winner right there.

– I think a lot of video production is telling a story; and that could be a happy story or a sad story, or many times to inspire, right?  Especially motivational videos on YouTube, they’re definitely telling a story, but also evoking some positive, motivational, or inspirational feelings, right?

Answer: You’re absolutely right, because when it comes down to it at the end of the day, if you have a video with audio, the audio is 50% of your video’s impact. If you have a video with audio that doesn’t match what you’re watching, it takes you out of the experience- 100%.  But if you have audio that matches what you’re watching, it can make the impact of the video 100 times better.

– It’s almost as if the measure of a well produced movie or video is that when you’re so involved in the story, that you don’t even notice the music, because it just corresponds so well, it all goes together.

Answer: Yeah, that’s what we hope for at AudioMicro. Content creators for YouTube,  production film houses, or for people that do podcasts. We’re here to help provide music to compliment your visual aspect to make your production the best it can be.  To Complement and Enhance your project.

– Do you ever get requests to help people find music or suggest music for their production?

Answer: Yes, I’m always more than happy to help our customers if they need assistance.  They can just write in to us with info like, “Hey, we’re doing like a little podcast about history and science, that we kind of want something that’s mellow acoustic.” I’ll point them in the right direction or put together 5 or 10 tracks of things that I think they might like.

– It’s great to know you all are there to help!  So, what’s something about AudioMicro that people probably don’t know.

Answer:  It’s a really great working environment at AudioMicro – We all have each other’s backs.  We’re all very chill & casual with each other- I could go talk to my supervisor or CEO and could talk about work or I could talk about something personal.  When you have a work environment where everyone meshes together so well, the productivity and the company morale becomes so high that it feels like the sky’s the limit.

We also have a room that is dedicated to chilling and taking a break.  We have an acoustic bass, a piano, bean bags and couches, and a PlayStation 4 for people want to play video games.  Throughout all hours of the day, you can hear someone in there either banging on the piano, plucking on a guitar, or playing a video game.

I think that is the best way to blow off some steam and clear your head, like if you’re working on something and you kind of hit a brick wall. You can go in there for 10 or 15 minutes, noodle around on the guitar to get some creative juices flowing, and then before you know it, you might be in the middle of playing a song and you go, “Oh, I got it!”  And go back to what you were working on.

– That’s perfect, because they say human beings can only focus efficiently for so long, and then they actually need to take a break and shift into something else.  So last question Joshua, what kind of music are you into right now?

Answer: Right now I’ve really been into Lo Fi Hip Hop to work to.  It’s kind of jazzy, there are a lot of samples from old jazz musicians and they tweak them to create some interesting sounds, and then I’m also really into classical rock and bands I grew up with like the Beatles, the Grateful Dead, Pink Floyd .

And also, I normally don’t tell people this, but I have a guilty pleasure… I like to listen to Korean Pop Music or K Pop.  My best friend from elementary and middle school was Korean so I’d always be at his house and that’s what him and his sister listened to all the time. So I learned about it back in 1997 and have been listening to it off and on for a long time, but more recently I’ve kind of gotten back into it.

I’m really digging this girl group called Black Pink.  They’ve been around for a couple of years but recently put out a new album and their sound is pretty different.. It’s like Korean girl rap trap music. Here’s the link to my favorite video.

Awesome Joshua, thanks for your time!

 

T O D A Y ‘S   T A K E A W A Y S

Takeaway 1:  Joshua’s A&R rating is based on track mixing, the melody fitting the genre, the quality of the sounds and plugins, the timing, and if the sounds help to evoke emotion or could help tell a story.

Takeaway 2:  It’s essential to find background or production music that matches your creative project in order to complement and enhance its impact!

Takeaway 3: Joshua and the team at AudioMicro are there to help if you need assistance in finding the right sounds for your production project.  Just write in Here.

Takeaway 4: AudioMicro promotes a work environment that is friendly, supportive, and honors their employees need to express creativity and take breaks!

Takeaway 5: Joshua secretly loves K-Pop! 😉

 

 

AudioMicro Royalty Free Licenses 101

A U D I O M I C R O   M U S I C   L I C E N S E S   1 0 1

 

 

 

 

 

Want to know more about what our Standard License for Music Track covers?
Let us give you the 411.

We’ll cover all the music licensing types in this article, but will focus on our tried and true- The Standard License for our Royalty Free Music Tracks.

We’re stoked to offer you the most affordable Standard License price in the industry, not to mention our HUGE library of HIGH QUALITY tracks, all for just $34.95 per song.  Woot!

So where can you utilize these tracks?  Let us count the ways…

  • In any free apps, podcasts, software, and games, utilized on iPhone, iPad, Android, & Facebook.  As long as it’s free, you’re free to use these songs as many times as you’d like!  Score!
  • In any non-downloadable casual games played exclusively via a web browser, both free and paid.  Live Games = Game on!
  • In any creative project videos that are non-advertisements, for TV, Radio, Wedding Videos, and Corporate Videos.  No Ads = No Problem!
  • ANYWHERE on the world wide web (we like to call it the Interwebs), including on YouTube, Vimeo, Facebook, Websites, Web Videos, & Slideshows.  That’s right, anywhere on YouTube land – so create away!
  • In any Film Festivals projects, both student and professional.  We love making big screen debuts!

And what about Reproduction?

The Fine Print :: The Standard License includes the reproduction of up to 1,000 copies of your project in physical, tangible products like CD’s, DVD’s, VHS tapes, Blu-rays, toys, and console games.

So, in sum, the Standard License is all you need, unless of course, you are using the music in the following scenarios. ::

  • For Ads- In an Advertisement to be run on Television or Radio
  • For Films Not at Film Festivals – In a commercial film release or theatrical presentation (excluding film festival screenings)
  • For large-scale Paid Games- In a paid (i.e. not free) iPhone/iPad/Android app, podcast, or downloadable software/game where more than 1,000 copies will be downloaded. Notice: Apps and games that offer “in-app” purchasing by the user are considering paid (i.e. not free) and require the Mass Reproduction License if more than 1,000 will be distributed.
  • For large-scale Reproduction- In over 1,000 physical/tangible reproductions of a product like CD’s, DVD’s, Blu-rays, toys, and console games.

So there are the In’s and Out’s of our Standard License, and all for $34.95!
Quite the steal, wouldn’t you say?  And just a reminder that your dollars are supporting the very deserving and talented musicians and artists who spend countless hours providing you with premium sounds!

Now remember, these deets cover our Music Tracks only.  Interested in Sound Effects SFX Licenses, click here.

Didn’t cover your intended use?  Keep reading for increased coverage.

Here’s a run-down of ALL the MUSIC LICENSE options – depending on your use:

B) MASS REPRODUCTION – $134.95 for up to 10,000 copies to $284.95 for unlimited.

This license is ONLY required if you wish to make over 1,000 physical/tangible reproductions of your product or utilize the music in a paid (i.e. not free) iPhone/iPad/Android/Facebook app, podcasts, software, and/or games where more than 1,000 copies will be downloaded.

Notice: The Standard License allows up to 1,000 downloads of both free and paid software/games as well as unlimited downloads of free (and not allowing in-app purchasing) iPhone/iPad/Android apps, podcasts, softwares, and games. Therefore, you do NOT need to purchase a mass duplication license unless you’re distributing over 1,000 physical/tangible reproductions of videos, softwares, games, toys within media such as CDs, DVDs, VHS tapes and the like OR using the music in paid (i.e. not free) iPhone/iPad/Android apps and podcasts to be downloaded more than 1,000 times.

Mass Reproduction license prices:

  • The standard license price of $34.95 plus $100 for up to 10,000 reproductions
  • The standard license price of $34.95 plus $250 for unlimited reproductions

 

C) TELEVISION/RADIO ADVERTISEMENT – $134.95 to $284.95.

This license is ONLY required if you are using the music in an Advertisement run on either Television or Radio.
Television / Radio Advertisement License prices:

  • For Music used in Local/Regional advertisements played on Television or Radio (with a range of 250 miles in all directions from the broadcast center), the price is the Standard License price of $34.95 plus $100 ($134.95)
  • For Music used in Nationwide/Worldwide advertisements played on Television or Radio, the price is the Standard License price of $34.95 plus $250 ($284.95 total)

 

D) THEATRICAL / COMMERCIAL FILM RELEASE – $284.95 for worldwide rights.

This license is ONLY required for commercial film releases and theatre presentations. Utilization of the music in non-commercial, educational, and editorial projects, like student films and contest submissions, is included in the Standard License. Please be sure to credit “Royalty Free Music by AudioMicro” in your project.

Theatrical/Commercial License Price:  The Standard License price of $34.95 plus $250 per track

Notice:
All of our licenses allow you use the music solely in your own projects. You cannot resell the music as a standalone product or create a derivative work that primarily contains just the music and the resell it as your own, such as a meditation CD with your voice running over the music. If you’d like to use the music in such a manner, please contact us for a special license arrangement.

Bonuses:
We offer a bonus of 20% on purchases over $500 and in the form of store credit to be used with your next purchase. Simply contact us after you have made your purchase and we’ll place the bonus into your account. We also offer bonuses for verified charities and nonprofits.

So that’s AUDIOMICRO’s Licensing 101 friends.

Let us know if you have any questions, and Go Forward and Create!

~The AudioMicro Team

Editing for the Horror Genre

Jacko_smaller

The horror genre in film is just as old as cinema itself; starting with silent films back in the late 1890s, through the masterpieces of Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho and Stanley Kubrick’s depiction of The Shining (based on Stephen King’s novel), to more recent films such as The Conjuring. Every Halloween you see an increase in horror films being released to the public, that point should be obvious. But have you ever stopped to ask yourself exactly what makes up a horror film? On the surface, you know a horror film is supposed to invoke terror or fear within you. However, there are specific techniques and timeless elements that are seamlessly woven into these films that make you cover your eyes and make the hair on the back of your neck stand on end. To get in the right mindset, take a gander at the finest moments from these horror movies:

As a filmmaker, you should be aware of some of the basic pieces of the horror puzzle. Not everything relies on how good of a scream your actor has, or how well the make up and costume on your monster looks. A good horror film first starts on paper with a solid story as a foundation. From there, it moves into the camera, the acting, and then down through post production – where I feel the real magic occurs.

Outlined below are three foundational elements every editor should have at their disposal for any horror film:

  • Color
  • Sound
  • Perspective

 

COLOR

On the set, gaffers and light technicians are in charge of creating the core atmosphere for each scene; whether it be something with high contrast, or just dark enough for a creature to creep out of the shadows. Sometimes, a filter will be put on the lens to add or enhance a specific color in the scene. Generally, a blue or green filter would be used with horror films. However, in-camera lighting can only go so far. These days, I find there is no filter added on the camera because you can change the color so easily in post production. The director may want to play around with an assortment of colors and hues to achieve their desired effect. In these instances, CURVES is an editor’s best friend.

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Curves can be found in most Non Linear Editing (NLE) programs such as Final Cut Pro, Premier Pro, and Avid. It can also be found in compositing programs such as After Effects and Nuke. Generally, the option will be under some type of IMAGE CONTROL menu or COLOR CORRECTION menu – if you cannot find it, I recommend consulting the Help Menu. Using Curves gives you control of an image’s highlights, shadows, and the RGB (Red, Green, Blue) color spectrum. If you receive editing notes from the director asking you to “push the image further,” generally, they mean to increase the shadows or contrast. A term they use for this in editing is “crush the blacks.” To do this, click and drag your curve to the proper settings of adjustment. By rule of thumb, blacks are located in the lower right and highlights are located in the upper left of the curve.

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If the director wants to increase a color tone, use the drop down menu to select the color of choice – whether they want to add more blue or green into the footage, respectively.

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SOUND

You sometimes cover your eyes during a horror movie, but most of the time you forget to cover your ears. Even if you can’t see the horrific image, you can still hear the bones crack, the blood spray, and the victim let out one last shriek or a dying breath. A lot of the sound effects are created by Foley Artists (the people who create sounds used in movies). For example, a foley artist would record the sound of a machete slashing a watermelon into little bits to be used where the serial killer slashes a victims skull into little bits. In larger budget films, a foley team is generally hired to produce the sound content for the film, supplying the editor with the appropriate sounds to populate the movie. However, in smaller, or micro budget films, the editor needs to turn to online sound libraries for this content. There are websites out there filled with random sounds, music loops, and scores – sometimes free – to populate your horror film. There are literally hundreds of these websites all over the internet. However, some websites I have had good luck with and recommend include:

 

PERSPECTIVE

This one tends to be less obvious to most editors just starting out in the field. Perspective plays a large part in creating a horrific landscape, or an uneasy tension. Often times, the director of photography will partner up with the director to explore the ‘look’ of the film, mapping out the best camera angles and shots to best achieve the directors vision. In some cases, the director will need the editor to adjust a scene or image to help intensify the scene. The easiest way to add tension to a plain scene is by rotating the image on a angle.

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By putting the perspective on an angle you subconsciously tell the viewer that “something isn’t right.” People like to see their world on an even playing field, and when you start to mess with that perspective, you begin making the viewer uncomfortable and on edge.

There you have it! A solid foundation in editing for the horror genre. Do you know of another horror element you would like to share or know of a link that could help out your fellow editor? Leave it in the comment section below!

 

For anyone concerned about selling their music on AudioMicro.com…

I’m a successful songwriter/composer who recently found out about AudioMicro, and became so enamored with the concept that I now am their Artist Recruiting Manager. In the past few weeks I’ve been talking to a lot of fellow musicians about AudioMicro, and the micro stock platform in general. There seems to be some mixed feelings and some misunderstandings about how artists fit into the whole micro stock picture.

For those who aren’t fully aware of the concept, micro stock simply means that the content (in this case audio/music) is crowd sourced – meaning ANYONE can submit content – and it’s sold for prices starting at $1 (in this case it’s $1 per minute of music). A few of my composer friends who make some decent money selling tracks for $30 or so in the royalty free space feel that micro stocking audio is going to devalue their music. It’s an understandable point of view, but in my humble opinion, a limited perspective.

See, whenever and wherever anything is sold, there is always the option of spending money on the high-end, or brand name version of the product, or the “generic” version of the product. If you use laundry detergent as an example, there is usually a few dollar difference between Tide and the generic brand, even though the ingredients are EXACTLY the same and we actually feel – sometimes better in the case of crowd sourced content.  Both brands make money and flourish because there will always be a market for both. Some people want to spend more money for the flashy brand, and some just want something that works regardless of the name or package. Sure you may make $30 or more by selling your music on a royalty free basis, but can it hurt you to open your “product” up to a consumer base that would rather spend less than that? Not at all in my opinion. People will still pay $30 for your music in that world just as fast people will spend a few bucks for your music in the micro stock world. You’re basically just opening up your customer base (the millions that can’t and won’t license audio for $30 a track) and creating new ways to make money by doing it. Not to mention the “theives” out there who only steal music — they’d also gladly pay $1 or 2 for music — it’s the same principle that has made iTunes so successful and has made people forget about scouring the internet for free music.

And above all, its risk free! At least take a handful of your tracks that haven’t ever earned a penny, and stick it up on this site. If you don’t like the way it works, just request to take em down. The artist has 100% ownership of their content and can remove it at any time.

In addition, AudioMicro offers the best royalty rate i’ve ever seen – 50% of every track sold.  As AudioMicro takes off, artists will be in position to make more money than ever before. When this site becomes the one-stop shop for stock audio, its not far fetched to think that many an artist could easily be making hundreds or even thousands of dollars a month, just in micro stock.

I can see how this will be the wave of the future, and as much as some musicians will resist the change, its the natural progression of things. Check out what has happened in the photography world and you’ll be amazed at how easy it is to find content, and how easy it is to make money from your art. Micro stock opens up opportunities for artists that never existed before, and makes it so much easier for those who need to place music in their visual medium. It’s the perfect give and take for both sides – its about as democratic as it gets. I see it as having your cake and eating it too – continue to sell some of your music for as much as you can. Take advantage of the high end and also upon up your content to an entirely new class of customer with micro stock. But while you’re plcaing tracks directly with high end customers you can put the rest of your stuff here on AudioMicro and make some extra money on the side and get a feel for the ease in which the micro stock concept works – for everyones benefit. We see some folks making over $100k per year in royalties in the micro stock photo realm and there’s no reason why this can’t be the case in the music space, which is actually a larger market than photos. It will just take some time for the concept to take off, but being there ahead of the curve will give you a huge advantage.

Thats my two cents. I’ve looked at other stock music sites, and AudioMicro is by far the most artist friendly, easiest to navigate, and the music upload process is a breeze. Not to mention that other sites offer only a measly 20% royalty rate or the ones that want you to “share your content for free” under a creative commons license or some other format. I applaud AudioMicro for seeing the future and trying to make sure that artists out there are well aware of the new market shift ahead of the curve and we encourage artists to jump on board and take advantage of the revolution rather than being resistant and scared of it.

Sincerely,

Gideon Black, Artist Recruiting Manager
www.audiomicro.com
Los Angeles, CA

(818) 651-6311

Micro Stock = The Future of Content Licensing

Rights Managed Licensing is on the decline. Royalty Free Licensing is stabilizing (aka “not growing”). Ad supported Licensing models (aka the YouTube way) are proving unmonetizable / unprofitable as well as distracting to viewers in addition to not providing royalties to the content creators / providers among other copyright infringement issues. A new buzz is around CPM / Pay Per Use Licensing. We like to call this new form of licensing “same product, different packaging, everybody gets screwed”. With CPM licensing, a user of content (let’s say a photography, video, or audio clips) pays a fee every time the content is viewed/heard. What ends up happening is that the publisher pays more for the content, the content creator gets a smaller royalty for their work (as the CPM facilitator takes a hefty cut of the action) and the customer is “eternally billed” and tracked for their usage of the content. The truth is that Micro Stock is the future of content licensing. Micro Stock creates entirely new content from new artists, the content is nearly identical to the high end “professional” rights managed content, it gives customers a simple, easy to understand, general use commercial license with no additional billings, and it pays a nice, healthy royalty to it’s content creators. Micro Stock is powerful, it’s taken down an entire $6 billion public company and made it into a $2 billion company. Micro stock is on pace to double in terms of it’s popularity / growth / quantity of content licensed in this manner, over the next 5 years. Micro Stock is here to stay!

Navigating the Music Micro Payment Environment

Micro Stock, also known as micro payment, is a concept new to musicians, audio engineers, and sounds effects engineers, as it is commonly used in the photography industry.? A common misconception about micro payment is that the quality of the music is somehow inferior to traditional rights managed music.? The idea that micro stock music is of an inferior quality is totally incorrect.? In fact, a great deal of the content found on micro stock audio and micro stock music sites is superior to the tracks found on high end licensor’s, it’s just that the content comes from un-signed and artists that choose to purposefully bypass the record labels and better maintain control of their content and rights.? AudioMicro allows its artists to maintain exclusive copyright ownership in their content.? The only rights that are given to AudioMicro are the non-exclusive right to license this content, in exchange for a healthy royalty share of 50%.? The artists can revoke his / her content from the site at any time (perhaps after striking a deal with a major), so there is really zero risk on behalf of the artists.? What many folks don’t realize is that, in the micro stock photography realm, there are many artists making well over $100,000 per year selling their content strictly on micro stock websites.? We feel that this handsome annual income is easily attainable for micro stock music licensees as more and more big advertising clients turn away from traditional, high priced, rights managed licensing and begin to adopt micro stock music and micro stock audio and the preferred method of licensing audio content for commercial and editorial use.

Introduction to Selling Stock

For those of you not familiar with the notion of selling stock music and selling stock audio, the folks here at Audio Micro would like to introduce you to this novel concept and help you monetize the digital assets you have created that are sitting on your hard drive, collecting dust, or should be say, taking of space / bytes.

First of all, anyone can upload and contribute to our archive, free of charge.? All you have to do is create sounds, beats, audio clips, sound effects, music and any other audio intellectual property that you own copyright to or are the original author of.? Once you have created the content, just sign up for a free account and upload your tracks.? The editors here are Audio Micro will review your submission for quality and post all of your acceptable files to our archive, which is available to stock music and stock audio buyers around the glove, 24 / 7 / 365.

When a clip from your account is licensed by a customers, you receive a royalty on this download, as typically 50% of the sales price.? Should you desire to assist Audio Micro in the editing / review process, we will grant you one free download credit for every clip you review, regardless of whether or not you accept or reject the clip.? The goal here is to maintain a high quality standard for our buyers while simultaneously ensuring that enough solid, licensable content makes it’s way into our archive.? It takes a certain degree of professional music judgment, but if you are an audio enthusiast, you should be able to pickup the editing process and get an idea for the type of content that’s acceptable, in no time.

We’re hopeful that you find this introductory post meaningful.? We will provide more tips as well as upload suggestions in future posts.