Description: The Scherzo No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 31 was composed and published in 1837. Schumann compared this scherzo to a Byronic poem, "so overflowing with tenderness, boldness, love and contempt." The renowned sotto voce opening was a question and the second phrase the answer. For Chopin it was never questioning enough, never soft enough, never vaulted enough. It must be a charnel-house. In popular culture, the piece is heard in the Woody Woodpecker episode "Musical Moments."

Description: The trio of Frédéric Chopin's Scherzo No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 31 transports us into what seems like another world, not just into a new tonal sphere. The Arcadia into which the trio carries us takes three different characters in turn. The first barely marks its presence, with just a few bars of a bucolic sicilienne. The second embodiment of Arcadia is of a waltz-like character, singing and swinging; Chopin has it sung by four different voices at once. The third incarnation of carefree Arcadia also pulls us into the whirl of a waltz, of a ritornel character.

Description: The Scherzo No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 31 was composed and published in 1837. Schumann compared this scherzo to a Byronic poem, "so overflowing with tenderness, boldness, love and contempt." The renowned sotto voce opening was a question and the second phrase the answer. For Chopin it was never questioning enough, never soft enough, never vaulted enough. It must be a charnel-house. In popular culture, the piece is heard in the Woody Woodpecker episode "Musical Moments."

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. This piece opens with a thundering five-note pattern in the left hand. Throughout the piece, the left hand continues this pattern as the right hand plays a powerful melody punctuated by trills, scales (including a rapid descending chromatic scale in thirds), and arpeggios. The piece closes with three booming unaccompanied notes - the lowest D on the piano. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by visions of blood, of earthly pleasure, of death, of the storm.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. This piece is brief, with slow majestic crotchet chords in the right hand predominating, against crotchet octaves in the left. It is often called the "Chord" prelude. It was originally written in two sections of four measures, although Chopin later added a repeat of the last four measures at a softer level, with an expressive swell before the final cadence. Used as a theme for variations by Ferruccio Busoni, and later, without the repeated bars, by Sergei Rachmaninoff in his Variations on a Theme of Chopin, a set of 22 variations in a wide range of keys, tempos and lengths. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized funerals, a funeral march.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. One of the longest preludes, it was the favorite of Clara Schumann. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by “she told me, ‘I love you’, a scene on the Place de Notre-Dame de Paris.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. The longest and perhaps the most famous of the twenty-four preludes. The main melody is repeated three times; the melody in the middle, however, is much more dark and dramatic. The key signature switches between D-flat major and C-sharp minor. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by immanent death, in the shadows, raindrops.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. The longest and perhaps the most famous of the twenty-four preludes. The main melody is repeated three times; the melody in the middle, however, is much more dark and dramatic. The key signature switches between D-flat major and C-sharp minor. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by immanent death, in the shadows, raindrops.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. One of the longest preludes and features an A B A structure with continuous single-note quaver movement in the left hand and chords and melody in the right. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by an adventure on foreign soil, under a night of stars, thinking of one’s beloved faraway, loss.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. The second prelude sets up an immediate contrast, with a slow melody over a fixed accompaniment of four-note chords played two eighth notes at a time. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by painful meditation, the distant, deserted sea, the presentiment of death.