Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. This prelude was also played at Chopin's funeral; its melancholy melody is primarily given to the left hand. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by homesickness, tolling bells.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. This piece was played at the composer's funeral. It consists of a slow melody in the right hand, that masterfully prolongs tonic resolution, and repeated block chords in the left hand, that descend chromatically. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by hovering above a grave, suffocation.

Description: Frederic Chopin composed the Andante spianato as an introduction to his Grande Polonaise Brilliante in E-flat major, Op. 22. The Andante spianato has the character of a nocturne, and at the same time of a lullaby. It forges an oneiric mood. Spianato means evenly, without contrasts, without any great agitation or anxiety. The piece sets the mood of a harmonious moonlit night, a landscape dominated by the reflecting surface of a lake, or even the singing of sirens on gently rocking waves or the immersion in a state of unwavering meditation. The arabesque of the piano wends its way endlessly above the nocturne-like accompaniment. The listener is drawn into a trance by the magic of music from the boundaries of dream and reality.

Description: Tradition has it that Chopin imagined the A major Polonaise functioning as a coronation polonaise. It bears the character of heroic military music, evoking for many interpreters the sounds of a snare drum in a festive parade or a royal ceremony.

Description: The principal theme of Frederic Chopin's Grande Polonaise Brilliante in E-flat major, Op. 22 combines soaring flight with spirit and verve, bravura with elegance - all of those features that characterize a dance in the style brillant. As befits a composition in the brillant style, the work is rounded off with a dazzling, refulgent coda. The end result is a work in grand style, par excellence virtuosic. The piece is a magnificent example of the genre. Played with the utmost fluency, subtlety and sensitivity to the beauty of the sound, it achieves exemplary elegance, freedom, and freshness.

Description: Frédéric Chopin’s Largo in E flat major, Op. posth. has the the melody of the song “God, Thou who Poland” that Chopin played at church during his final year at the Warsaw Lyceum. The anthem-like melody is calm, yet stately, prideful, and elevated.

Description: Frédéric Chopin’s Largo in E flat major, Op. posth. has the the melody of the song “God, Thou who Poland” that Chopin played at church during his final year at the Warsaw Lyceum. The anthem-like melody is calm, yet stately, prideful, and elevated.

Description: Frédéric Chopin’s Largo in E flat major, Op. posth. has the the melody of the song “God, Thou who Poland” that Chopin played at church during his final year at the Warsaw Lyceum. The anthem-like melody is calm, yet stately, prideful, and elevated.

Description: Frédéric Chopin's Nocturne in B-flat minor, Op. 9, No. 1 has a rhythmic freedom that came to characterise Chopin's later work. The left hand has an unbroken sequence of simple arpeggios throughout the entire piece, while the right hand moves with freedom in patterns of seven, eleven, twenty, and twenty-two notes. The opening section moves into a contrasting middle section, which flows back to the opening material in a transitional passage where the melody floats above seventeen consecutive bars of D-flat major chords. The reprise of the first section grows out of this and the nocturne concludes peacefully with a Picardy third.

Description: Frédéric Chopin's Nocturne in B-flat minor, Op. 9, No. 1 has a rhythmic freedom that came to characterise Chopin's later work. The left hand has an unbroken sequence of simple arpeggios throughout the entire piece, while the right hand moves with freedom in patterns of seven, eleven, twenty, and twenty-two notes. The opening section moves into a contrasting middle section, which flows back to the opening material in a transitional passage where the melody floats above seventeen consecutive bars of D-flat major chords. The reprise of the first section grows out of this and the nocturne concludes peacefully with a Picardy third.