Description: Composed in 1832, Frédéric Chopin’s Nocturne in F-sharp major, Op. 15, No. 2 is a technically challenging piece. The first section, Larghetto, features an intricate, elaborately ornamental melody over an even quaver bass. The second section, labeled doppio movimento (double speed), resembles a scherzo with dotted quaver-semi quaver melody, semi-quavers in a lower voice in the right hand, and large jumps in the bass. The final section is a shortened version of the first with characteristic cadenzas and elaboration, finishing with an arpeggio, falling at first, then dying away.

Description: Frédéric Chopin composed his most popular Nocturne in E-flat major, Op. 9, No. 2 when he was about twenty. The nocturne is reflective in mood until it suddenly becomes passionate near the end. The new concluding melody begins softly but then ascends to a high register and is played forcefully in octaves, eventually reaching the loudest part of the piece, marked fortissimo. After a trill-like passage, the excitement subsides; the nocturne ends calmly.

Description: The Mazurka in C sharp minor delights the listener with its songfulness. It was written in the style of new simplicity and in expression of a melancholy tone.

Description: The Mazurka in B minor is one of Chopin's great wonders. In it, one hears a synthesis of the heard and remembered with the personally experienced and profoundly true. Lyrical contemplation and dialogue, eruptions of passion, rocking and calming.

Description: The Mazurka in B minor is one of Chopin's great wonders. In it, one hears a synthesis of the heard and remembered with the personally experienced and profoundly true. Lyrical contemplation and dialogue, eruptions of passion, rocking and calming.

Description: The B flat major Mazurka has the form of a rondo. The refrain, of unconventional design, thrusts its way upwards, swinging and swaggering, before falling back down in a delicate scherzando. The Mazurka is one of the few that could be danced; indeed, it seems to pull the listener up onto the dance-floor.

Description: The B flat major Mazurka has the form of a rondo. The refrain, of unconventional design, thrusts its way upwards, swinging and swaggering, before falling back down in a delicate scherzando. The Mazurka is one of the few that could be danced; indeed, it seems to pull the listener up onto the dance-floor.

Description: The F sharp minor became one of Chopin's best loved mazurkas. It consists of three dance themes. The first of them dominates the whole of this lyrical-dance miniature with a character of a rhythmically capricious and melodically refined folk tune.

Description: The Impromptu No. 3 in G-flat major, Op. 51 was composed in 1842 and published in 1843. It carries within it something of the atmosphere of Frédéric Chopin’s salon – an exceptional salon, not conventional and snobbish, but as poetic as it is elegant, transporting its denizens into another dimension.

Description: Frédéric Chopin's Fantaisie-Impromptu in C-sharp minor, Op. posth. 66, is a solo piano composition. It was composed in 1834 and dedicated to Julian Fontana, who published the piece despite Chopin's request not to do so. The middle section of the piece brings music that is typical of the slow sections of nocturnes. It proceeds at a moderato cantabile tempo, spinning out sotto voce a melody in D flat major, which returns a couple of times, as if unable to find a way out of the labyrinth. The melody of the Fantaisie-Impromptu's middle section was used in the popular song "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows". It was also heard in a Tom and Jerry cartoon Snowbody Loves Me and in the 1956 film Autumn Leaves. It is also heard in the Woody Woodpecker episode "Musical Moments from Chopin". The same music was also featured in the 2003 film Lost in Translation as a cellphone ringtone of Bob Harris, and in the 2013 film Jobs as played in a diner.