Description: An upbeat clarinet catchy short melody.

Description: Rondo alla turca constitutes the last (third) movement of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Piano Sonata No. 11 in A major, K. 331 (300i), most likely composed in Vienna or Salzburg around 1783. The last movement, "Alla turca," popularly known as the "Turkish March," is often heard on its own and is one of Mozart's best-known piano pieces. Mozart himself titled the rondo "Alla turca." It imitates the sound of Turkish Janissary bands, the music of which was much in vogue at that time.

Description: Menuetto. Trio constitutes the second movement of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Piano Sonata No. 11 in A major, K. 331 (300i), most likely composed in Vienna or Salzburg around 1783. The second movement of the sonata is a standard minuet and trio movement in A major. The minuet is 40 measures long, and the trio is 52.

Description: Menuetto. Trio constitutes the second movement of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Piano Sonata No. 11 in A major, K. 331 (300i), most likely composed in Vienna or Salzburg around 1783. The second movement of the sonata is a standard minuet and trio movement in A major. The minuet is 40 measures long, and the trio is 52.

Description: Frédéric Chopin's Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35, popularly known as The Funeral March, was completed in 1839 at Nohant, near Châteauroux in France. However, the third movement, whence comes the sonata's common nickname, had been composed as early as 1837. The Sonata is considered to be one of the greatest masterworks of the nineteenth century. These are the powerful closing cords from the fourth movement Finale: Presto of the Sonata. The movement contains a whirlwind of unremitting parallel octaves, with unvarying tempo and dynamics, and not a single rest or chord until the final bars. It has been described as the "wind howling around the gravestones."

Description: The Scherzo No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 31 was composed and published in 1837. Schumann compared this scherzo to a Byronic poem, "so overflowing with tenderness, boldness, love and contempt." The renowned sotto voce opening was a question and the second phrase the answer. For Chopin it was never questioning enough, never soft enough, never vaulted enough. It must be a charnel-house. In popular culture, the piece is heard in the Woody Woodpecker episode "Musical Moments."

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. This piece Contains exuberant ostinati. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by a tree full of songs, uncertainty.

Description: The principal theme of Frederic Chopin's Grande Polonaise Brilliante in E-flat major, Op. 22 combines soaring flight with spirit and verve, bravura with elegance - all of those features that characterize a dance in the style brillant. As befits a composition in the brillant style, the work is rounded off with a dazzling, refulgent coda. The end result is a work in grand style, par excellence virtuosic. The piece is a magnificent example of the genre. Played with the utmost fluency, subtlety and sensitivity to the beauty of the sound, it achieves exemplary elegance, freedom, and freshness.

Description: The B flat major Mazurka has the form of a rondo. The refrain, of unconventional design, thrusts its way upwards, swinging and swaggering, before falling back down in a delicate scherzando. The Mazurka is one of the few that could be danced; indeed, it seems to pull the listener up onto the dance-floor.

Description: Étude Op. 10, No. 12 in C minor, known as the Revolutionary Étude or the Étude on the Bombardment of Warsaw, is a solo piano work by Frédéric Chopin written circa 1831, and the last in his first set, Etudes Op.10, dedicated to his friend Franz Liszt. Unlike études of prior periods (works designed to emphasize and develop particular aspects of musical technique), the romantic études of composers such as Chopin and Liszt are fully developed musical concert pieces, but still continue to represent a goal of developing stronger technique.