Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. This piece Contains exuberant ostinati. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by a tree full of songs, uncertainty.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. This prelude has a running semiquaver bass part throughout. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by the singing of the stream, the feeling of Thou Art So Like a Flower.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. This prelude has a running semiquaver bass part throughout. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by the singing of the stream, the feeling of Thou Art So Like a Flower.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. This prelude has a running semiquaver bass part throughout. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by the singing of the stream, the feeling of Thou Art So Like a Flower.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. The second prelude sets up an immediate contrast, with a slow melody over a fixed accompaniment of four-note chords played two eighth notes at a time. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by painful meditation, the distant, deserted sea, the presentiment of death.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. This brief opening prelude is unified by a triplet-semi-quaver figuration as the hands run over the keys. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by the feverish anticipation of loved ones and reunion.

Description: Belongs to Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, a set of short pieces for the piano, one in each of the twenty-four keys, originally published in 1839. Chopin wrote them between 1835 and 1839, partly at Valldemossa, Majorca, where he spent the winter of 1838-39 and where he had fled with George Sand and her children to escape the damp Paris weather. In Majorca, Chopin had a copy of Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, and as in each of Bach's two sets of preludes and fugues, his Op. 28 set comprises a complete cycle of the major and minor keys, albeit with a different ordering. This brief opening prelude is unified by a triplet-semi-quaver figuration as the hands run over the keys. It’s mood and/or theme is characterized by the feverish anticipation of loved ones and reunion.

Description: Frederic Chopin composed the Andante spianato as an introduction to his Grande Polonaise Brilliante in E-flat major, Op. 22. The Andante spianato has the character of a nocturne, and at the same time of a lullaby. It forges an oneiric mood. Spianato means evenly, without contrasts, without any great agitation or anxiety. The piece sets the mood of a harmonious moonlit night, a landscape dominated by the reflecting surface of a lake, or even the singing of sirens on gently rocking waves or the immersion in a state of unwavering meditation. The arabesque of the piano wends its way endlessly above the nocturne-like accompaniment. The listener is drawn into a trance by the magic of music from the boundaries of dream and reality.

Description: Frederic Chopin composed the Andante spianato as an introduction to his Grande Polonaise Brilliante in E-flat major, Op. 22. The Andante spianato has the character of a nocturne, and at the same time of a lullaby. It forges an oneiric mood. Spianato means evenly, without contrasts, without any great agitation or anxiety. The piece sets the mood of a harmonious moonlit night, a landscape dominated by the reflecting surface of a lake, or even the singing of sirens on gently rocking waves or the immersion in a state of unwavering meditation. The arabesque of the piano wends its way endlessly above the nocturne-like accompaniment. The listener is drawn into a trance by the magic of music from the boundaries of dream and reality.

Description: Frederic Chopin composed the Andante spianato as an introduction to his Grande Polonaise Brilliante in E-flat major, Op. 22. The Andante spianato has the character of a nocturne, and at the same time of a lullaby. It forges an oneiric mood. Spianato means evenly, without contrasts, without any great agitation or anxiety. The piece sets the mood of a harmonious moonlit night, a landscape dominated by the reflecting surface of a lake, or even the singing of sirens on gently rocking waves or the immersion in a state of unwavering meditation. The arabesque of the piano wends its way endlessly above the nocturne-like accompaniment. The listener is drawn into a trance by the magic of music from the boundaries of dream and reality.