Description: Étude Op. 10, No. 6, in E-flat minor, is a study for solo piano composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. It was first published in 1833 as the sixth piece of his Études Op. 10. This étude focuses on expressiveness and chromatic structuring of the melody as well as polyphonic texture. The piece has the character of a dark doleful nocturne, a sad elegy of meditation whose melody is full of sorrow and grief.

Description: Étude Op. 10, No. 5, in G-flat major, is a study for solo piano composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. It was first published in 1833 in France, Germany, and England as the fifth piece of his Études Op. 10. The so-called "Black Key Etude" is one of the most popular. It presents a cascade of ‘pearly’, perhaps even slightly ‘glassy’, sonorities, executed with charm and amusement. It is famous for its very idea and the related name: the ‘black keys’ Etude. According to Liszt, it expresses mocking humour – something rare in Chopin. Sometimes referred to as "Ladies Salon Etude."

Description: Étude Op. 10, No. 5, in G-flat major, is a study for solo piano composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. It was first published in 1833 in France, Germany, and England as the fifth piece of his Études Op. 10. The so-called "Black Key Etude" is one of the most popular. It presents a cascade of ‘pearly’, perhaps even slightly ‘glassy’, sonorities, executed with charm and amusement. It is famous for its very idea and the related name: the ‘black keys’ Etude. According to Liszt, it expresses mocking humour – something rare in Chopin. Sometimes referred to as "Ladies Salon Etude."

Description: Étude Op. 10, No. 4, in C-sharp minor, is a study for solo piano composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. It was first published in 1833 as the fourth piece of his Études Op. 10. This passionate study, a very fast Presto con fuoco, features continuous sixteenth notes (semiquavers), in perpetuum mobile fashion involving both hands.

Description: Étude Op. 10, No. 4, in C-sharp minor, is a study for solo piano composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. It was first published in 1833 as the fourth piece of his Études Op. 10. This passionate study, a very fast Presto con fuoco, features continuous sixteenth notes (semiquavers), in perpetuum mobile fashion involving both hands.

Description: Étude Op. 10, No. 4, in C-sharp minor, is a study for solo piano composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. It was first published in 1833 as the fourth piece of his Études Op. 10. This passionate study, a very fast Presto con fuoco, features continuous sixteenth notes (semiquavers), in perpetuum mobile fashion involving both hands.

Description: Étude Op. 10, No. 4, in C-sharp minor, is a study for solo piano composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. It was first published in 1833 as the fourth piece of his Études Op. 10. This passionate study, a very fast Presto con fuoco, features continuous sixteenth notes (semiquavers), in perpetuum mobile fashion involving both hands.

Description: Étude Op. 10, No. 1 in C major is a study for solo piano composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1829. It was first published in 1833 as the first piece of his Études Op. 10. This study in reach and arpeggios focuses on stretching the fingers of the right hand. Its harmonies resemble a chorale and its relationship to Bach's Prelude No.1 in C major (BWV 846) from the Well Tempered Clavier has been noted by musicologists.

Description: Étude Op. 10, No. 1 in C major is a study for solo piano composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1829. It was first published in 1833 as the first piece of his Études Op. 10. This study in reach and arpeggios focuses on stretching the fingers of the right hand. Its harmonies resemble a chorale and its relationship to Bach's Prelude No.1 in C major (BWV 846) from the Well Tempered Clavier has been noted by musicologists.

Description: The Barcarole in F-sharp major, Op. 60 is a grand, expansive work from the late period in the oeuvre of Frédéric Chopin. Written in the years 1845-46, it was published in 1846. Chopin refers in this work to the convention of the barcarola - a song of the Venetian gondoliers which inspired many outstanding composers of the nineteenth century, including Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Liszt and Fauré. Yet it is hard to find a barcarolle that would compare with Chopin's work for beauty and compositional artistry.