Description: Claude Debussy’s “Ballade slave” (“Slavic Ballad”) is piece for the solo piano that rests on a single theme and the repetition of its basic motifs. It is tangibly Russian in character, constructed around the principles of variation technique. Despite its Russian flavor, the piece contains a clear hint of Debussy's great sea music with its wide-flung left hand arpeggios.

Description: Claude Debussy’s “Ballade slave” (“Slavic Ballad”) is piece for the solo piano that rests on a single theme and the repetition of its basic motifs. It is tangibly Russian in character, constructed around the principles of variation technique. Despite its Russian flavor, the piece contains a clear hint of Debussy's great sea music with its wide-flung left hand arpeggios.

Description: Claude Debussy’s “Ballade slave” (“Slavic Ballad”) is piece for the solo piano that rests on a single theme and the repetition of its basic motifs. It is tangibly Russian in character, constructed around the principles of variation technique. Despite its Russian flavor, the piece contains a clear hint of Debussy's great sea music with its wide-flung left hand arpeggios.

Description: Claude Debussy’s “Ballade slave” (“Slavic Ballad”) is piece for the solo piano that rests on a single theme and the repetition of its basic motifs. It is tangibly Russian in character, constructed around the principles of variation technique. Despite its Russian flavor, the piece contains a clear hint of Debussy's great sea music with its wide-flung left hand arpeggios.

Description: Claude Debussy’s “Passepied” (a type of dance which originated in Brittany) constitutes the final movement of his famous piano suite “Suite bergamasque.” In F sharp minor and marked “allegretto ma non troppo,” it is a happy, strangely medieval, piece, which is surprisingly faster than its Baroque counterparts. Throughout most of its duration, the piece is played with staccato arpeggios in the left hand.

Description: Claude Debussy’s “Passepied” (a type of dance which originated in Brittany) constitutes the final movement of his famous piano suite “Suite bergamasque.” In F sharp minor and marked “allegretto ma non troppo,” it is a happy, strangely medieval, piece, which is surprisingly faster than its Baroque counterparts. Throughout most of its duration, the piece is played with staccato arpeggios in the left hand.

Description: Claude Debussy’s “Clair de lune” (“Moonlight”) constitutes the third and most famous movement of his popular piano suite “Suite bergamasque.” In D flat major and marked “andante très expressif,” it is played mostly pianissimo. Musically, Debussy’s “Clair de lune” belongs to French Impressionism.

Description: Claude Debussy’s “Clair de lune” (“Moonlight”) constitutes the third and most famous movement of his popular piano suite “Suite bergamasque.” In D flat major and marked “andante très expressif,” it is played mostly pianissimo. Musically, Debussy’s “Clair de lune” belongs to French Impressionism.

Description: Claude Debussy’s “Menuet” constitutes the second movement of his famous piano suite “Suite bergamasque.” In A minor, its playful main theme contrasts with an alternatively mysterious and dramatic middle section. The piece is particularly original, as it does not conform to the particular style that most minuets share. Rather than being very airy and dainty, it shows much more raw comedy. Debussy sets a very novel piece in the guise of an old dance style.

Description: Claude Debussy’s “Menuet” constitutes the second movement of his famous piano suite “Suite bergamasque.” In A minor, its playful main theme contrasts with an alternatively mysterious and dramatic middle section. The piece is particularly original, as it does not conform to the particular style that most minuets share. Rather than being very airy and dainty, it shows much more raw comedy. Debussy sets a very novel piece in the guise of an old dance style.

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