Motion 5 Tutorials

by kesakalaonu on July 15, 2015

icon256 Motion 5 Tutorials

Since its creation in 2004, Apple Motion has been an application that has evolved quite nicely, despite the fierce competition it faces from other apps like After Effects and Nuke. In its current iteration, Motion provides the plugin architecture for Final Cut Pro X, which means that all FCPX effects are actually Motion templates. With that advantage, users can create just about anything with Motion. Below are a few tutorials where Motion users illustrate how versatile the application is for their workflows.

Creating a Transition for FCPX

This tutorial highlights one of the core features of Motion, which is the ability to create custom transitions. Gone are the days of having to stack layers and utilizing keyframes. With a decent understanding of the Motion interface and its functions, users can create unique transitions to suit their video projects. In this particular example, the author shows users how to create a ripple flash transition from start to finish. When I discovered that you can create transitions and other effects in Motion, I decided to give Motion another try after years of being an After Effects user. I found this tutorial useful because even at the basic level, you can get an understanding of how far you can go with the creation of custom effects.

Animating a Photoshop File

There will be situations where your client wants to create a spot and you have no b-roll. Even worse, you have very minimal images to work with. However, they provide you with a layered, high resolution Photoshop file which you can animate and turn into a motion graphic with a little imagination. In this tutorial, Telemundo editor Brett Gentry shows us how he was able to take a client graphic and turn it into a 30-second spot using a combo of Motion and Photoshop. Utilizing markers, keyframes, and behaviors, he takes what I call a simple “Ken Burns effect” and makes an entertaining spot for an event. I will be first to admit that the Motion interface can be daunting at first glance, but watching how others work in it so efficiently inspires me to learn more.

Creating a Auto Green Screen Keyer with Background

There are projects you receive where the talent was shot on a green screen, and you need to key them out and insert the same background. If this is no more than five people, no big deal. However, if it is multiple talents and it needs to look like they were all keyed and composited the same way, it can become tedious. In the tutorial above, Brett shows us another way he uses Motion to create an auto keyer effect, which will allow him to key not only his talent, but insert/manipulate the background he wants behind them. This is convenient when you need to cut multiple spots or short form videos and time is not on your side. This effect is also a viable solution for the scenario I mentioned above with multiple talents. If you publish enough parameters and include the necessary assets, you can save a lot of time by creating an auto keyer effect in Motion.

Text Behind Glass Effect

I’ve highlighted the effects you can create in Motion for workflow tasks like titles, transitions, and effects, but it is always interesting to see how far one can push Motion to create things you would only expect in After Effects. This tutorial above is a prime example of something I wasn’t sure Motion could create. Editor/plugin author Simon Ubsdell takes a concept that originated in After Effects and creates it from scratch in Motion. Using textures, text layers, blend modes, filters, and behaviors, Simon creates this effect which can be used for promos, documentaries, or identifiers. I have to give kudos for the content that Simon has produced as of late. I’ve always believed the reason Motion wasn’t as popular as After Effects was because of the vast community and gurus that are out there. Seeing a dedicated user showcase Motion capabilities peeks my interest to add this tool to my skill set.

Overall, Motion has matured into a intricate and versatile tool that editors should take the time to learn. The market tends to favor the After Effects user, but every now and then there are jobs for people with Motion knowledge. Knowing this tool can benefit you in the long run.

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FCPX Workflow Tips Across the Internet

by kesakalaonu on December 12, 2014

FCPX logo 1 300x300 FCPX Workflow Tips Across the Internet

For the last three years, Final Cut Pro X has seen improvements that have furthered its stake in the NLE world. Since its release in 2011, it’s been meet with criticism and praise from many. Recently, professionals from across the world have stepped up to offer their tips for being efficient in FCPX and showcasing its potential. I want to share a few tips I’ve come across from working professionals who use Final Cut Pro X to get their projects done. After you see what tips these pros offer, you may look at FCPX in a more positive light than before.

Smart Organizing with Keyword & Smart Collections

Written by Braden Storrs, an FCPX editor and enthusiast, this article provides quick and effective organization techniques using FCPX’s library management model. He endorses creating two folders with keyword and smart collections. Within the smart collections, he recommends you name each collection for items that may be common within your project (i.e. multicam clips, dialogue, music, compound clips, notes, unused video, etc.) Once you’ve named your smart collections, make sure that you use specific rules for each collection so that they show up each time you click them.

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tumblr inline nd97buFlSb1r4py0o FCPX Workflow Tips Across the Internet

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In regards to keyword collections, these are project specific, so make sure to create them for specific items in your project as you work. Keep them in a standalone template library file so that you can grab and place them in a new project library to speed things up. Since reading this article, I’ve finally developed a quick and efficient workflow for cutting in FCPX. I finally understand the speed comments made by FCPX editors.

Optical Flow Transition Technique

The next tip I came across online was from FCPX editor T Payton. In this video tutorial, he shows us how to create optical flow transitions to hide edits made on an interview. This technique is popular among Avid Media Composer editors using the Fluid Morph transitions, which allows them to merge jump cuts into a seamless transition. His technique involves the use of speed ramping and exporting multiple times to accomplish this effect. I find the technique to be of great use for those of us who cut a lot of interview bites. However, the amount of steps it takes to achieve the effect could be cumbersome, especially on large projects. The time tested technique of covering jump cuts with b-roll makes more sense than this, unless the client wants a straight cut of a talking head during this interview portion.

Tips for Editing Under Pressure

top ten fcpx pressure 300x119 FCPX Workflow Tips Across the Internet

This is an article written by editor and FCPX plugin developer Peter Wiggins of Idustrial Revolution. In the article, Peter gives ten tips for editing in FCPX when time isn’t on your side. Having background rendering on, making a snapshot before any radical changes, and hiding waveforms before media import stood out to me, and considering that Peter does a lot editing that ends up on the air relatively quickly, it’s good to know what tips can help you under pressure. Even with the fastest computer and hardware available, you will run into unforeseen circumstances that can interrupt your edit, so it’s always good to know a few handy tips to keep yourself efficient.

These are a small collection of tips I’ve come across the internet for improving your workflow in Final Cut Pro X. As I’ve seen from multiple users, there is no clear cut way for cutting in FCPX, which is why it is so dynamic. Try these tips and techniques yourself, and see if you improve in speed and efficiency.

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Practical FCPX Tutorials

by kesakalaonu on April 24, 2014

FCPX logo 1 410x410 Practical FCPX Tutorials

One thing I’ve always enjoyed about tutorials, is that they can teach you skills you wouldn’t have known unless by trial and error… or luck. I can honestly say that my skill set comes from what I’ve learned from various tutorials. However, many tutorial authors advise that you use skills you learn from their tutorials as a launchpad to real world and practical situations. Just because a tutorial can show you which buttons or commands to use in a program, doesn’t mean that it will teach you how to be a better storyteller. I do believe that there are people who offer practical tutorials for everyday, real world situations that you may encounter as an editor. In particular, I’ve come across many talented editors who have shared practical tips when it comes to using Final Cut Pro X, as well as Motion. Ever since its release, people have spent more time defending its editing capabilities, versus showing why it’s faster to utilize its workflow. I’m going to highlight some FCPX editors who have willingly shared practical tips and workflows when using Final Cut Pro X.

Chris Fenwick (Digital Cinema Cafe & FCP X Grill)

No one I know has put more effort in showcasing and highlighting how much depth Final Cut Pro X has more than Chris Fenwick. As the senior editor for Slice Editorial (and host of two of my favorite industry podcasts, Digital Cinema Cafe & FCP X Grill) Chris has created a plethora of practical FCP X tutorials he has discovered through his work and experimentation. Below are three tutorials that I personally found helpful in adopting the workflow of FCPX.

In each of these tutorials, you learn something that can be implemented immediately on any project. The “Poor Man’s” dynamic link, as Chris calls it, is great for folks who use After Effects for their motion graphics work and need a workaround for swapping out updated elements without doing a lot of importing. The multicam trick he shows using compound clips to achieve the CNN look, while still being able to cut to different angles like a technical director, is brilliant. Trying to do it any other way now would seem like a time consuming and a frustrating endeavor. Being able to swap out lower thirds, like Dustin Hoye does in the last video, is incredible. Knowing that I can type in the information I need for a subject, and change the look while maintaining the information with ease, is something that will aid in tight deadlines. Tips like these would convince me of the power and ease of a FCPX workflow.

Michael Garber (Garbershop)

Michael Garber is a talented freelance video editor with many years of using Final Cut Pro legacy, and he’s one of the foremost authorities when it comes to Final Cut Pro X. He has written many articles highlighting how his workflow has been accelerated, thanks to learning the features that FCPX has to offer. In this video below, Michael shares a tip for editing audio bits in the magnetic timeline by creating a secondary storyline. By using this technique, the audio segments you edit won’t shift should you need to add an additional piece of footage. Also, the secondary storyline acts as a placeholder for adding additional audio down the line.

Brett Gentry (BeatusMongous)

Brett is a Las Vegas editor/post production manager I discovered recently who cuts content for Telemundo. In his tutorials, he demonstrates techniques in Final Cut Pro X that allow him to cut multiple spots and commercials in very little time. In the two videos below, Brett showcases how utilizing Final Cut Pro X and Motion 5 workflow has allowed him get through projects at an efficient pace.

In the first tutorial, Brett shows us how he was able to emulate the look of a commercial for a law firm that aired in English utilizing the FCPX keyer, simple transitions/effects, stock footage, and custom Motion templates. I believe the only people who have done something on this scale are the folks of Ripple Training with their FCPX promo training course. In the second tutorial, Brett shows us how to create a keyer template effect for clients you may deal with on regular basis. He creates three effects to deal with the multiple camera edits of two tight shots and a wide shot. With these templates, Brett is able to cut similar segments of the same client in very little time. This technique is definitely something I wish I knew about when these programs were released. With the amount of green screen work editors deal with these days, knowing I can create something like this between Motion and FCPX would definitely convince a wayward user of the power of this workflow.

Overall, I believe these editors have provided some great tips and workflows for Final Cut Pro X that would have only been discovered through trial and error, or by purchasing a course. I’ve talked with FCPX editors who have told me how much faster they have become since using the program, but not many of them want to share tips like these gentlemen have. Maybe in time, the FCPX community will provide more practical tutorials like these to really champion how professional and timesaving the FCPX/Motion workflow is.

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