Description: The Sonata No. 3 in b minor, Op. 58 was composed in 1844 and published in 1845. It retains the dramatic structuring inherited from the Classics. Here, as in Mozart and Beethoven, the composition – rendered coherent by means of differences, contrast and end-weighting – comprises four movements. The second movement, Scherzo, brings a breath from another world – more from the realm of A Midsummer Night’s Dream than from the world of real, profound feelings. The lightness and airiness of this figuration gives a moment of respite. The Scherzo passes, like a dream or a distant memory.

Description: The Sonata No. 3 in b minor, Op. 58 was composed in 1844 and published in 1845. It retains the dramatic structuring inherited from the Classics. Here, as in Mozart and Beethoven, the composition – rendered coherent by means of differences, contrast and end-weighting – comprises four movements. The second movement, Scherzo, brings a breath from another world – more from the realm of A Midsummer Night’s Dream than from the world of real, profound feelings. The lightness and airiness of this figuration gives a moment of respite. The Scherzo passes, like a dream or a distant memory.

Description: The Sonata No. 3 in b minor, Op. 58 was composed in 1844 and published in 1845. It retains the dramatic structuring inherited from the Classics. Here, as in Mozart and Beethoven, the composition – rendered coherent by means of differences, contrast and end-weighting – comprises four movements. The second movement, Scherzo, brings a breath from another world – more from the realm of A Midsummer Night’s Dream than from the world of real, profound feelings. The lightness and airiness of this figuration gives a moment of respite. The Scherzo passes, like a dream or a distant memory.

Description: The Sonata No. 3 in b minor, Op. 58 was composed in 1844 and published in 1845. It retains the dramatic structuring inherited from the Classics. Here, as in Mozart and Beethoven, the composition – rendered coherent by means of differences, contrast and end-weighting – comprises four movements. The second movement, Scherzo, brings a breath from another world – more from the realm of A Midsummer Night’s Dream than from the world of real, profound feelings. The lightness and airiness of this figuration gives a moment of respite. The Scherzo passes, like a dream or a distant memory.

Description: The Sonata No. 3 in b minor, Op. 58 was composed in 1844 and published in 1845. It retains the dramatic structuring inherited from the Classics. Here, as in Mozart and Beethoven, the composition – rendered coherent by means of differences, contrast and end-weighting – comprises four movements. The narrative of the first movement, Allegro maestoso, rises and falls, ranging from accents of strength, from tumult and terror, to moments of nocturne-like quietude, before ultimately finding a haven in the two lyrical themes. It is they that fill the reprise, concluding the first act of the Sonata in lyrical exultation.

Description: The Sonata No. 3 in b minor, Op. 58 was composed in 1844 and published in 1845. It retains the dramatic structuring inherited from the Classics. Here, as in Mozart and Beethoven, the composition – rendered coherent by means of differences, contrast and end-weighting – comprises four movements. The narrative of the first movement, Allegro maestoso, rises and falls, ranging from accents of strength, from tumult and terror, to moments of nocturne-like quietude, before ultimately finding a haven in the two lyrical themes. It is they that fill the reprise, concluding the first act of the Sonata in lyrical exultation.

Description: The Sonata No. 3 in b minor, Op. 58 was composed in 1844 and published in 1845. It retains the dramatic structuring inherited from the Classics. Here, as in Mozart and Beethoven, the composition – rendered coherent by means of differences, contrast and end-weighting – comprises four movements. The narrative of the first movement, Allegro maestoso, rises and falls, ranging from accents of strength, from tumult and terror, to moments of nocturne-like quietude, before ultimately finding a haven in the two lyrical themes. It is they that fill the reprise, concluding the first act of the Sonata in lyrical exultation.

Description: The Sonata No. 3 in b minor, Op. 58 was composed in 1844 and published in 1845. It retains the dramatic structuring inherited from the Classics. Here, as in Mozart and Beethoven, the composition – rendered coherent by means of differences, contrast and end-weighting – comprises four movements. The narrative of the first movement, Allegro maestoso, rises and falls, ranging from accents of strength, from tumult and terror, to moments of nocturne-like quietude, before ultimately finding a haven in the two lyrical themes. It is they that fill the reprise, concluding the first act of the Sonata in lyrical exultation.

Description: Frédéric Chopin's Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35, popularly known as The Funeral March, was completed in 1839 at Nohant, near Châteauroux in France. However, the third movement, whence comes the sonata's common nickname, had been composed as early as 1837. The Sonata is considered to be one of the greatest masterworks of the nineteenth century. This is the celebrated funeral march in B-flat minor of the third movement Marche funèbre: Lento. Beginning and ending the Sonata, the funeral march gives the sonata its nickname. The emotive "funeral march" has become well known in popular culture. It was used at the state funerals of John F. Kennedy, Sir Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher. It was also played in the funeral of the Spanish poet Miguel Hernández and at the graveside during Chopin's own burial at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris.

Description: Frédéric Chopin's Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35, popularly known as The Funeral March, was completed in 1839 at Nohant, near Châteauroux in France. However, the third movement, whence comes the sonata's common nickname, had been composed as early as 1837. The Sonata is considered to be one of the greatest masterworks of the nineteenth century. This is the calm interlude in D-flat major of the third movement Marche funèbre: Lento, a graceful melody that is childlike, innocent, fragile, and defenceless. It serves as a hint of one's dearest memories, a moment that is acutely touching.